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tv   Lockup Raw  MSNBC  January 31, 2015 7:00pm-8:01pm PST

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due to mature subject matter, viewer discretion is advised. >> follow "lockup" producers and crews as they go behind the walls of america's prisons and jails. the scenes you've never seen. "lockup: raw." the cuyahoga county corrections center in downtown cleveland, ohio, is just like other jails, in that most of the inmates are only charged with crimes and are awaiting trial at the resolution of their cases. and jails located in big cities
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also share a common challenge -- >> get down, get down! >> managing gangs. during our extended stay shoot in cleveland, we covered the activities of a homegrown gang known as the heartless felons. 25-year-old ramal hammond was facing several charges including robbery and assault to which he pled not guilty and was awaiting trial. he was regarded as one of the heartless felons' highest ranking members. >> how high up were you? >> i'm higc. >> it means that he can delegate. that put him a little bit above a boss. >> jail officials say hammond was the heartless felons' shot caller and targeted other inmates for theft, assault, and extortion, so they segregated him from most other inmates. >> i'm housed in the gang pod, 23 and 1, because they say i've been fighting too much.
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>> the first day we met hammond, he was petitioning gang investigator sam mcclaren to release him back to general population. >> i'm trying to get off 23 and 1. >> how you trying? >> i ain't got riders or none of that. >> you knocking out people, man. >> i'm not knocking out people, man. all right, man, but, listen, but -- >> you can't even look at me and tell a straight face -- >> you right, you right, you right, you right. i'm just saying -- >> we got individuals out there now that's either scared to come out of their room, can't use the telephone, can't get a tray. they're being persecuted by individuals wanting to put their will on them. ramon hammond, give him his props. he's -- he's for real. he's a fighter. and he don't mind fighting. but he has a rule. if you go against his principles, you will pay. i will beat that ass, that's how he put it, i will beat that ass. that's hammond. >> i'm a nice dude. a lot of people don't think so. a lot of people think i'm a
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grimy person and they can't trust me, but i'm a good dude for real. if i mess with you, i mess with you. if i don't, you might see the other side. >> he was brutally honest. he was very honest about his love for the game, which was his drug dealing career, as well as being a gang member. >> i sell crack cocaine. i've been selling drugs since i was like 13. if i don't sell it to them, somebody else going to sell it to them, so why not? that's how i look at it. >> a lot of the heartless felons had no real family support. it was obvious that they came together in order to create their own family as a gang. but with ramal, that wasn't the case. he had a lot of family members. in fact, he told us that he was the oldest of 12 siblings. >> hammond's gang family, the heartless felons, and his biological family were about to intersect. ra maul's younger brother, paris hammond, was next door in the juvenile detention center.
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we were there the day paris became an adult, and his life was about to take a dramatic turn for all of the wrong reasons. >> today, i'm going to take inmate paris hammond, who used to be a juvenile and is now 18, turned 18 today, he's going to be moved from our juvenile pod into our general male population. he's not going to be with the kids anymore, he's going to be with the -- as we call them, the big boys. he's graduating today. >> did you think you'd spend your 18th birthday like this? >> yeah, i already got time. >> paris had recently pled guilty to two counts of felonious assault with a firearm, for shooting a 15-year-old boy during an argument and leaving him paralyzed. when we met him, he was only days away from being sentenced to a prison term that could range from five to 18 years. despite his guilty plea, paris told us he's innocent. >> i didn't shoot him. >> so you're convicted of a crime and you're saying you didn't do the crime? >> yes, ma'am. >> you took a plea to something you didn't do? >> yeah. >> why? >> i was going to take it all the way to trial.
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if i would have went, i probably would have went home, but if i lost, i was getting 42 years flat. and my mom says she don't know how long she'll be living, because she's getting older, so i did what my mom told me and what my brother told me, and i took it. >> for paris, the advice of his older brother, ramal, meant a lot, because ramal was more to him than just a sibling. >> like i said, i never had no father, i looked up to my brother. he taught me how to be safe in the streets. he taught me how to go to school. he taught me how to dress. all type of stuff. always wanted to be like my brother. love him so much. >> i tried to influence him to go to school. i used to hear about him breaking into people's houses and stuff, but a lot of people was getting killed for that type of stuff, you feel me? so i'm like, you don't got to break -- i'm like, you should learn from your big brother. i don't break into people's houses, i sell drugs. >> ramal at times told paris, hey, this isn't the life, you're not cut out for this. but as soon as he decided, yeah,
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i'm going to fall ra maul, he's like, hey. i tried, i did what i could, but he's going to follow and that's just the way it's going to be. >> i started making him sell dope with me. we got to take care of the family together. >> he sat me down, he taught me the game. >> like i said, i don't want him to be in this, but i love to hear that he excelling and he doing good. >> in his own odd way, ramal thought he was actually helping paris. but really, i think he was more interested in how -- what paris could do for him. >> my little brother, he a juvenile. if you a juvenile and you selling drugs, man, you're not going to no jail. now, if they get me, it's probably three years, five years and stuff. but he get it, probably six months, you know? so anytime i don't feel comfortable with something, that's what i have my little brother for. >> i know my brother wasn't just getting me to sell drugs. what he couldn't do, he wanted me to achieve better. that's love for me.
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>> all right. turn around and face me. open your mouth. stick out your tongue. turn your head left. turn your head right. run your hands through your hair for me. >> ramal did something else for paris that later contributed to his current problems. >> i gave him his first gun when he was 11. >> why would an 11-year-old need a gun? >> the streets, people make so much money, people started to hate. they try to rob you and all type of stuff. my brother just told me, you know, be safe at all times, so i just took it from there. >> coming up -- >> i'm serious, why -- i'm on 23 and 1. we separated. >> come on. >> i'm for real! >> ramal hammond appeals to staff to let them see his brother. and when another pair of brothers drops out of their gang, all they have left is each other. e micro clean formula works in just 3 minutes, killing 99.99% of odor causing bacteria. for a cleaner, fresher, brighter denture everyday.
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due to its size and secluded location, the alameda county jail, which primarily serves the city of oakland, california, could easily be mistaken for a prison. and with 3,000 inmates, it's one of the biggest jails in the west. that translates into a lot of stories for our five-person production team to cover. finding them involves meeting as many inmates as possible. >> everybody is cool with being on? you guys -- just kind of, just sitting here, just like this. just like this, at the window. >> at the window? >> yes. >> taking my shirt off. >> wherever you went, you'd meet one person that was completely different than the next. oftentimes, the deputies will tell us about certain inmates, and one inmate that was brought up was gabriel taylor. >> this is what we got right here, y'all. we got 14 cells of depression, exactly. >> gabriel taylor had been charged with burglary and vehicle theft, to which he had
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pled not guilty. he was housed in the protective custody unit, or pc, because he had dropped out of his gang. and in jail or out, that made him vulnerable to attack. >> let's protest, y'all. >> protest? >> yeah. >> see where that gets you. >> yeah, pepper spray and a taser. yeah. >> when i first met gabriel, i was taken by his charisma. he was very funny, he was very honest, and he just had kind of a vibrant personality. >> we bet on "american idol," all that. who's going to be the next pope. everything's a competition, you know what i'm saying? >> and i'd already heard the tale about the misspelling of his tattoos. and i knew that there must have been a funny story behind that. >> on my lower portion of my stomach, it was supposed to say something, and it don't say it right. i don't even want to talk about it. i'm not going to embarrass myself. >> what was it supposed to say? >> it was supposed to say danielle, but it don't. and i'm going to leave it at that. it's so [ bleep ] embarrassing, it's [ bleep ], all right?
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>> who is danielle? >> that's my daughter's mom. but, yeah, i mean, just for [ bleep ] entertainment purposes, i'm going to tell you, it says daniel, and it says, "daniel's world." >> and where is this located? >> like, oh, man. right above my [ bleep ]. >> gabriel had a lot of tattoos, but one he had on his back, and that was his brother's ezekiel's name and he said he had it on there because ezekiel always had his back. he constantly told me about him and spoke about him as if they were best friends. >> i can't say he's my everything. he's more than that. i don't know, man, he's my mom, my dad, my brother, my son. he's everything that i got in this world. he's my reason for being. >> it's a "lockup" show, msnbc. >> we got to the jail one morning and we had a plan in mind of what we were going to do and a deputy comes up and tells us that gabriel, his brother ezekiel has been booked in. so immediately, our plans had changed for the day. we went into a holding cell
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where he was at and started talking to him. and he basically was just the person that gabriel described him to be. >> what's up, bro? >> ezekiel was back in jail due to a probation violation on his original conviction for burglary. he was assigned to the same protective custody unit as gabriel, because he too had recently sworn off gang life. >> we tell each other every day, if i walk by here, point at me and do a little heart to me. i'm like -- you know, like he's my girlfriend. >> we've been together our whole lives. we can probably count on one hand how many things i don't know about him. he's my brother. >> we grow up together, through the foster system and group homes, both our parents are deceased. it came to a point where if he couldn't stay at the group home i was in or foster home i was in, we're going to run, we're going to meet each other in the same spot. we will sleep in a stolen car together or, excuse my french, i won't tell it on camera, but we would be sleeping, and he would give me some food and every night, we'd make sure we was all right.
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me and him took care of each other. i raised him, he raised me. and we all we got. >> you're his older brother. does that give you a little more responsibility? >> it does, but at times, he's been my older brother. i can all honesty -- >> more often than not. >> nah, but in a way, especially since -- i've been struggling with an addiction. like crystal meth, man, that is a hell of a drug, man, and i'm new to it, you know. i've seen my brother crying, looking at me like, you're a dope fiend. at times, he plays the big brother role. there's times he would steal clothes and put them on my back. >> if i was addicted to heroin or whatever, my brother's going to take care of me, period. that's my brother. >> take care of my back like his. i named two of my kids after him. one has his first name, ezekiel, and one is justin. that's my brother. i've got his name across my back, the only tattoo on my back, and i leave that for a reason, that's the only man that got my back.
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i am my brother's keeper. we've lived by that motto since we was kids. >> the last connection i got blood relation to my father. i'm my brother's keeper. know what i mean? i am my brother's keeper. >> before i met ezekiel, the way gabriel used to talk about him, i just assumed the two were twins. and then when i actually saw them together, the way they were together, they would finish each other's sentences, they knew each other's histories, they just had such a bond together, that i was very surprised when they actually told me they were a year apart. >> "keeping up with the kardashians" ain't got nothing on us. i'm telling y'all. i don't know, man. >> both brothers have had a revolving-door relationship with the jail since they were juveniles, growing up in oakland foster homes. >> i just did the math the other day. and so far, i've done eight years and two months. i've been in jail over 20 times, from juvenile hall time as well. first time i was in juvenile hall, when i was 12 years old.
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>> the first time i went to jail, i was 11 years old. we're not even going to count how many times i've been in jail. let's count how many times i've been out of jail. that's easier. from 11 to right now, to 26, i've been out of jail totally three years and nine months. >> one thing that had kept the taylor brothers coming back to jail was also a source of division between them. coming up -- >> my daddy ain't raising no dope fiends. why all of a sudden you want to start using drugs? and -- >> i start making red velvet cake, peach cobbler, strawberry cheesecake. >> only days from his sentencing, paris hammond reveals his passion. >> that's a lot of sugar, man. e. well, did you know you that former pro football player ickey woods will celebrate almost anything? unh-uh. number 44... whoooo! forty-four, that's me!
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or go to lifelock.com/go. try lifelock risk-free for 60 days and get this document shredder free -- a $29 value -- when you use promo code go. call now. growing up on the streets of cleveland, ohio, paris hammond followed his older brother, ramal, into a life of gang banging and drug dealing. we met them inside the cuyahoga county corrections center in downtown cleveland. at the time, paris was only days away from being sentenced after
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pleading guilty to shooting a 15-year-old boy, leaving him paralyzed. >> shooting at people, robbing people, hustling. bad stuff always, like, is going to come back to you. it's called karma. >> i would characterize paris as pretty emotionless. he rarely showed any kind of reaction to anything. >> but we would soon learn, there was something that paris was passionate about. >> i did the main interview with paris, so then i got up and tracy, our segment producer, sat down, because when she asked the questions that are a little lighter, you know, anything about their life that has nothing to do with crime. >> so, i just wanted to chat a little bit about fun stuff. do you have any hobbies or anything like that? >> well, my mom taught me how to cook. >> suddenly, paris said he loves baking. that kind of sparked my interest. i think off-camera, i said -- >> what would you dream about becoming? if it wasn't on the streets, did you ever have a dream about being something else and having a different life? >> i wanted to become a pastry chef.
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>> i think everybody kind of paused for a moment and thought, wow, we didn't see that coming. and it was actually one of the first times where we felt like we had a breakthrough with him. >> i just start like making cookies, then i start making red velvet cake from there. peach cobbler, strawberry cheesecake, apple pie. >> you made all that? >> yeah. >> was it any good? >> oh, yeah. >> we met paris on his 18th birthday. he had just transferred from the jail's juvenile detention center to the adult facility. and though it seemed he had little to celebrate, paris decided to make a birthday cake. >> it's going to be called layer cake. >> do you know about his baking skills? >> he only had the ingredients that one can get in commissary, and it's this potpourri of cakes, fudge, candies, the whole thing. >> see, i ain't never seen no cake this tall.
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it's a monster cake. >> how did you come up with the idea to do this, paris? >> being incarcerated. you learn a lot of new things when you're around different people. >> i filmed so many of these shows and usually they just take their ingredients, they throw it together, they mix it around, put in some spices, put in some different candies or whatever, and it's done. but in this case, he was so methodical about each item and how it lined up on the cake. and 45 minutes, an hour had elapsed and he was still adding ingredients precisely. >> you know you've spent an hour on this thing? >> what's that for? >> i wanted to make the icing, we don't got milk, so just nutter butters and water. >> that's a lot of sugar, man. >> paris made the most elaborate prison concoction i think i've ever seen. >> look how thick that is. >> personally, i thought the thing looked pretty delicious. i think that was the most delighted i've ever saw paris become. he really seemed to focus on it. he seemed very serious about creating this cake.
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and then wanting to share it with others. >> but for paris, the experience was bittersweet. >> i don't know if i'm going to have a pastry shop when i come home. >> why? >> too much time already lost. >> under the terms of his plea deal, paris would be sentenced to between five and 18 years in prison. the final decision is up to his judge. >> it's crazy. just everything just going so fast. life is just passing by so fast. i think about it every night. >> did you know he had dreams of becoming a pastry chef? >> i know he liked baking. i know he'd be high as hell he could go in the kitchen and cook a cake or cookies or something. so, yeah, i knew he wanted to do something. >> paris hammond's older brother, ramal, a high-ranking member of the heartless felons gang, remained in lockdown. ramal, like many other heartless felons, joined the gang during his stay in juvenile detention. >> be the biggest thing this century. that's the future i want. i want to be the biggest thing
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on the streets. i want this stuff to go from ohio to 40 other states. you feel me? >> what are you? >> what you mean? >> gang-wise? >> hf. ain't going to lie to you. >> what's your rank? >> ain't got no rank. >> he is a heartless felon and we'll call him a young felon. he loves his brother. he loves his brother. because he knows his brother stands tall. he knows his brother is well liked in the family. he knows his brother is well known in the family. he knows what his brother stands for. and that's what he wants to be. he wants to be like his brother. >> my brother, like, he's a veteran, he's been through all the stages. like anywhere he go, people know him. >> if i see my brother right now, of course i'm going to hug him, yes. that's my little brother. i'll tell him i love him for real. >> ramal hopes the jail will reunite him with paris by placing them in the same housing unit together. >> you haven't been down to see
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your little brother yet? >> are you going to send him up here? i'm serious, we on 23 and 1. we separated. >> come on. >> i'm for real. >> no, we don't put felons in together. >> this situation right here, i can't help my brother, that's the scariest thing i can honestly say. not being able to help my own -- my family member when they really need me. that's scary. >> coming up, the younger hammond siblings and their mother arrive at court to support paris on the day he is sentenced. and -- >> i'm telling america before i'm telling gabriel. >> what? >> that i'm about to have a kid. >> ezekiel seemed on a very clear path. due to mature subject i would quit then i'd go right back to it. chantix absolutely helped me quit smoking. along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. chantix helped reduce my urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix.
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due to mature subject matter, viewer discretion is advised. we've covered dozens of gang stories on "lockup." but the ones that really stay with us are about the young men who have tremendous potential, that they've squandered away by joining a gang. the story of two brothers in oakland struck us that way. and their story had a deeper impact on our crew and our staff than possibly any story we've ever told. >> gabriel and ezekiel taylor both happen to be at the alameda county jail during our extended stay shoot there. >> he's in a pissy ass mood
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today. what's wrong with you, dude? >> tired, bro. >> let this dude sleep, he's starting to piss me off. >> the taylor brothers shared a lot in common. they grew up in oakland's foster care system. they had both joined a gang, but dropped out shortly before we met them. and they told us they were finally ready to give up their revolving-door relationship with jail. >> one of the things about both gabriel and ezekiel was their honesty. and i appreciated it. they were pretty honest about their lives. and when i asked ezekiel how he made a living, how he used to make a living, he was very forthright and he told me he made a living robbing drug dealers. >> i only rob dope boys. what you're doing is illegal, so chances are if i do something illegal to you, it's just going to chalk it up to the gang. >> there's a dangerous aspect to that. did you ever have any problems with that? >> i've been shot. i've been shot am in my face, been shot in my thighs, my back, my ass. i've been shot a few times.
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but, i mean, it's the cost of doing business. >> i was struck by ezekiel's loathing of drugs and drug addiction. i mean, drugs seem to surround ezekiel in many ways. i mean, i think it caused a deprivation in his childhood. his brother, whom he adored, had a drug addiction, and that really bothered ezekiel. >> my daddy ain't raising no dope fiends. why all of a sudden you want to start using drugs? you going to let somebody else convince you to pay them your money, take out of your children's mouth, so you can poison yourself? that's just stupidity. that's beyond stupid. >> ezekiel can't stand me. if you see somebody sitting there cutting on theirself, basically, cutting theirself, cutting their throat, you keep stopping them but he keeps cut himself, it's the same thing watching me, ezekiel watching me get high. and i've watched him sitting
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there crying, and i'll be like, why the [ bleep ] you crying, bro. and he's like, look at you. >> all right, i need you to clap your hands. up high. >> oh, okay, that's how you get to levels and all of that? got it. >> during the course of ezekiel's interview, i was asking standard questions about marriage, children, that sort of thing, and he kind of sadly said, you know, i've been locked up so much, i've never had the chance to have children. but then he stopped himself and said, but, actually, that's changing. >> and actually right now, i do, i got one in the works. i told you before i told my brother. i'm telling america before i'm telling gabriel. >> what? >> that i'm about to have a kid and my kid is due in june. yeah, june. yeah. >> world series of chess. it's going on. >> i had very high hopes for ezekiel. gabriel knew he was struggling. gabriel was honest saying he
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wasn't sure how he was going to do. but ezekiel seemed on a very clear path of having a better life. >> and this piece goes like this, right? >> yeah, yeah, yeah. yeah, yeah. >> becoming a father was a big deal to him. he already had a solid job. he knew he wanted to pursue education. and he also mentioned that, you know, he was done with robbing drug dealers and had been for a while. he didn't want to touch a gun again. >> i can tell you what i want to do. i can't say what's going to happen. if i can get released from here and get hit by a car, you never know. but my intentions, i'm not robbing nobody no more. i ain't touched a gun in years. and i won't touch a gun. know what i mean? i don't got to look over my shoulder anymore, all that [ bleep ] is done and over with. i don't got to worry with the street life. the street life is the farthest thing from my mind. so what can i focus on? my child.
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>> check. >> got it. >> and down goes frazier. >> got it. you know what it was? the glare from the camera got in my eye. [ bleep ] happens, right? know what i'm saying? >> we were interviewing both brothers at the same time, and by this point, i knew them pretty well. we'd spent a lot of time with them. and i thought they both had a lot of potential. and they both expressed the desire to change when they got out of this latest jail stint. so i asked them, where do you guys see yourselves in five years? and gabriel expressed that he wanted to move to louisiana, so he could get a fresh start. >> right now, i've got to take a break for me. i've got to go out there and work on my character, because i'm not going to succeed out there. i'm just too weak. i came here and wanted to change
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so much, but as soon as i get out, to put the plans in motion is hardest. so i need to go out there and go back to the drawing board, work on myself. work on gabriel. >> and then ezekiel had this very clear idea. he would only give me a year. >> a year from now, i'll be collecting my tax return from working my two jobs, one under the table and one on the books, and i'll take that and i'll buy cars. you buy a car for $1,000 and put a price tag on it for $1,300. all five -- you sell all five of those cars, you just made what, 12? $1,200 profit. and keep doing it. it's just like selling dope, but you're selling a commodity. everybody needs a car. >> a lot of the guys i talk to, for them a tax-paying citizen is a good citizen. it's somebody who is living on the right side of the law. and he was one of the rare people who referenced that as a goal. >> so a year from now, that's where i see myself. and then after that, talk to me in a year, then we can talk about five years. coming up -- >> as i spoke with him more, i found out what he liked to read. >> a "lockup" sound mixer shares an interest with ezekiel taylor. and the judge hands down his sentence on paris hammond.
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it was at the cuyahoga county corrections center in cleveland that we met 18-year-old paris hammond. he said he once had dreams of becoming a pastry chef, but instead he followed his older brother ramal, a known shot caller in the jail's largest gang, the heartless felons. we were with paris on the day he was sentenced on two counts of felonious assault for shooting a 15-year-old boy and leaving him paralyzed. his plea deal called for a sentence between five and 18 years in prison. outside the courtroom, the hammond brothers' mother, tanya, had just arrived with several of ramal and paris' younger siblings. >> i'm here with my children and my nephew and a family friend. i'm hoping that the judge will
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give my son leniency. >> how you feeling about today with your brother here? >> mad. mad. >> why? why are you mad? >> because they're trying to give him a long time and take him away from us. >> how are you feeling, worried, concerned, scared, what? >> i don't know. >> paris, he wanted to become a pastry chef. that was his dream. i hate that he did follow his brother. i really do. we had other goals for him and instead, he wanted to be like his brother. it was devastating. as a parent, to have not one, but two in jail. >> you're the next little brother in line. so how do you stop this? >> i'm going to college. i ain't doing what they do. i'm scared. >> of what? >> going to jail. >> all rise. please be seated. >> let's go on the record. we are here in open court,
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court's criminal docket, this is case 558346, entitled state of ohio versus paris j. hammond. mr. hammond, you put in your form here that you filled out that you were a member of a gang. >> i was a heartless felon ogys. >> is that what you told the folks in the jail, you were a part of the heartless felons and you don't want any part of them now? >> yes, your honor. >> anything else you want to tell the court? >> i'm sorry for what happened. i take full responsibility of my action. i'm sorry to him and his family and just hoping that i get a second chance. i want to come home and change my life and be able to do right. >> i've looked closely at your prior criminal history. now that i know and you admit that you're part of a gang and this is what heartless felons do. and for that reason, you need to be punished, you need to be
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separated from society. this is the life you chose. this is the consequences you must accept. so the court's going to impose 18 years at lorraine correctional institution. >> watching paris in that courtroom, his face, when he heard his sentence, that he got the maximum, he did seem a little shocked. i don't think he even knew how to deal with it. >> all rise. >> step out. >> i love you, mom. >> i love you too. >> they gave him the maximum time. >> 18? >> the maximum time. >> 18! >> i don't know what to say, where to go, because i really can't believe it. >> they was devastated. i mean, i reacted, i couldn't believe he got 18 years. but he handled it -- he ain't crying in the courtroom, did he? he tough. so i mean, he handled it better than i thought he would. 18 years, that's a long time.
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>> i ain't think i deserve all that time, because i didn't do it. so i really don't think i should have got that much time. >> what do you mean you didn't do it? when you got up there, you were apologizing, like you were taking responsibility, and saying how sorry you were. >> they said, you going to take this plea, you've got to cop out and say you did it, so i had to say i did it, but i really didn't do it. >> he did it. he did it. tell him i said he can quit denying it. he done already got time for it. he might as well just say he did it. he did it. >> he felt no remorse, no guilt that his little brother was going to be going away for 18 years to prison. >> you know, i seen the downward spiral he was going, but at the same time, it's his life. it's what he wanted to do. >> he was 11. you gave an 11-year-old a gun. >> i helped him get here, but he made these decisions hisself. >> ramal had been so open about how he brought paris into the
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drug dealing world, i had to ask. i said, you have an 18-month-old son. is this the world you want for him? >> honestly, if that's the life he choose, i cannot stop it. i mean, i will hope that he -- my son don't sell drugs, but if he grew up and sells drugs, i mean, i just want him to be the best drug dealer he can be in the world, you feel me? so, i mean, that ain't what i want him to do, but if he does it, be good at it son, man, for real. that's all i can say. >> how you been holding up out there? >> a few hours after sentencing, paris made a call to his younger brother, with a very different message. >> don't follow me in my footsteps. i already know you ain't, though, but i'm just telling, i love you, though, you already know that, right? >> i want him to do something better in life. i don't want him to be like me. coming up, the "lockup extended stay" team receives tragic news.
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this is your cameraman locking himself in the cell. >> what i won't do for the shot. what i won't do. >> depending on their position, each member of a "lockup" field team has his or her own unique take on day after day working inside correctional facilities. michael st. claire, or paunch, has recorded audio on dozens of "lockup" shoots. >> in jail, you're listening to someone's stories, listening to somebody explain how they killed somebody, you know, in stereo. it's a pretty intimate way to get to know somebody. you can hear everything, you know, from time to time, you can hear a heartbeat, you can hear if they're hungry. when the camera's off, you know, they'll often tell stories about something they wouldn't want to say when the camera's on. ♪ >> some of that. >> but even when the sound is
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not rolling, paunch finds other ways to connect with the inmates. >> did we do -- >> most of the time, when i'm interacting with an inmate, it will be over something i can find in common with them. usually sports or, you know, joking around, just about anything. >> my new favorite inmate. what's up, man, i'm paunch. >> guillermo. nice to meet you. a lot of times books. i'll notice what an inmate's reading. if it interests me, i'll talk to them about that. paunch developed a bond with ezekiel taylor while filming at the alameda county jail. near oakland, california. >> we were interviewing ezekiel and he was kind of an easy dude to joke around with. so we kind of got along good right away. >> i gotcha, man. i'm a professional at this now. >> i know, you make it easy. >> and as i spoke with him more, i found out what he likes to read. >> i've read a lot of books about, like, the rwandan holocaust over there in africa. i mean, just -- i'm real interested in history and in genocide. i mean, like, why would hitler
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want to do that? why would hannibal ride clear across the globe to go conquer rome when you live way the [ bleep ] over in africa. like, you come in way in the hell -- why? it all boils down to greed and it helps you understand people. because, me, i'm really into sociology too. >> i just finished a book that was called "king leopold's ghost," about leopold ii and his exploitation of the congo. seemed like it was right up his alley. so i was done with the book, i figured i'd just give it to him. help him kill a little bit of time while he was in jail. come to find out, i couldn't give it to him because of jail rules. >> paunch would have to wait until ezekiel's release from jail to give him the book. that day was quickly approaching. ezekiel was housed in the protective custody unit with his brother gabriel. >> i'll be out the day before my birthday. happy birthday. >> how you feeling about that? >> ready to go back to work. ready to go back to work. >> every time, right off the
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center of that square. it ain't got to be pretty, long as it go in, right? ain't got to be pretty. see what you got? don't want it? can't get hurt on the job? >> ezekiel said he had traded in a career of robbing drug dealers for a job as a roofer. >> it's hard. i can make good money working, though. i can make pretty good money. >> better than robbing drug dealers? >> it's not as fast or as easy, but at the end of the day when you get home, when you take your boots off and you just feel like you accomplished something. >> that's how you got to do. >> with his first child due to be born shortly after his release, ezekiel said he had a new motivation to do well. >> my thing was i never had something to lose. truthfully, that's always been my opinion. but now, a child changes the game. i mean, i have something to lose. >> but as ezekiel's release date approached, gabriel feared for
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his brother. he was afraid their former gang affiliations could bring harm to ezekiel. >> they don't play games in oakland. that's the little taliban. we live in al qaeda. they see my brother and try to make an example out of him and i just see his name plastered, i don't know what i'd do. >> make this, so i can finish my card. >> just days before ezekiel was due to leave, we covered the taylor brothers interacting with other inmates in their housing unit. >> ezekiel was making what they call a spread, take a number of commissary items and turn it into a feast for a number of people who want to participate in it. >> what do you call this? >> goulash. the same thing you call it. goulash. jailhouse goulash. how about that? >> so the spread was finished, ezekiel called some of the inmates over so they could all eat. and they were going to say their prayers first. >> one of the inmates who came over to share the meal is michael souter, a friend the taylor brothers knew from the outside. >> dear heavenly father, may you
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bless this food we are about to receive, let it nourish our body and strengthen our souls. may it bless the less unfortunate. in jesus' name we pray, amen. >> amen. >> down the assembly line. go ahead, self-serve. >> this was just a routine part of the shoot. the kind of thing we do all the time. i had no idea how significant this would become. >> we don't belong to no gang. ain't no politics over here. we just partners, all friends in an unfortunate environment, making the best of our stay, though, know what i mean? >> two days later, we followed ezekiel as he left the jail for his home in oakland. >> thank you. >> good luck, okay? >> good to meet you. paunch, where you at, man? i want to read "king leopold's ghost." >> when he got released, we happened to be filming him, and i went to give him a book, hopefully to keep him out of trouble a little bit. i just thought he'd like it. seemed like it was right up his alley. i hope he read it. i always kind of wondered. i left him my number and told him to give me a buzz, if he
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ever got out to new york to call me. i don't know if he read the book. >> did you say good-bye to your brother? >> yeah, i kind of teared up. i hate that he's leaving. i used to sit in here every day and get the paper and we would go straight to the local section and you'll find in briefs, shootings in oakland. and i always read to see if i see my brother's name there. i don't know what i would do. that would devastate me. i'd probably lose my mind. >> while i was on the road, working out in grand rapids, i was in bed one night at the hotel and my phone started going off. and i woke up and i grabbed my phone and i had gotten a text message from a deputy in oakland telling me the news that ezekiel had been murdered. i immediately grabbed my computer and started searching
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for news articles online and, unfortunately, i was able to pull one up that confirmed that it was indeed true. and after that, i figured i had to reach out to the rest of the people that had worked on the show and people back at the office. so i was up the rest of the night, writing e-mails and just trying to process this. >> i was filming at the tulsa county jail, and it was the middle of the day, and i get this e-mail from jake. and he was telling all of us that ezekiel had been shot and killed. and i was shocked. i actually think i started to cry a little bit, but because i was in the midst of this other shoot, you know, i had to stay professional. but it just haunted me. >> a few days later, an article had been written that actually named a suspect, and i read this article and right after that, i received a text from the jail saying that the suspect had, in fact, been an inmate at the jail
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while we were filming. once i heard that, i decided to look at our release log for all the inmates that we had signed, and lo and behold, his name was on there. >> two months later, police arrested the prime suspect in ezekiel's death, michael souter. he was charged with murder and pled not guilty. >> we had known this man. i watched this man holding hands with the brothers during a prayer circle. >> in jesus' name we pray, amen. >> y'all ain't brothers. >> home video we were able to acquire showed ezekiel and souter together on the day of ezekiel's death. they were friends. and according to witnesses, they got into an argument later that day. >> i think finding out about ezekiel, particularly being shot and killed, was so disturbing to me. i have to be honest, my initial reaction was, he must have gone back to his old ways of robbing drug dealers. i was able to reach out to one
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of the taylor brothers' close friends and he was the one who told me what supposedly happened to ezekiel. and when i learned that in fact it was over an argument, over something insignificant like a card game, i was even more devastated. it just seemed like such a horrible mistake and a true tragedy. he was so empowered by becoming a father. his whole motivation for changing was because he was going to have a child. that this just, just, just seemed like such a tremendous loss and a tremendous waste. >> it's been fun, but i gotta run. right? give you guys a mike. >> then we're going to get a parting shot of you leaving. >> all right. no problem with that. >> this is the kind of bull [ bleep ] that happens, you know? you know, i can't really understand it, because it's not an environment that i ever grew up in, but, yeah.
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>> i don't want to be one of those oh, yeah, he's a good dad when he's around, when i can get ahold of him, when he'll pick up the phone, or when he's not in jail. and the way to do that is wake up in the morning, take a shower, eat your breakfast, go to work, come home, sit down, and enjoy being a father. sit down and enjoy your life, period.
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due to mature subject matter, viewer discretion is advised. follow "lock up" producer and crews as they go behind the prisons and jails with scenes you have never seen. "lock up, raw" [ screaming ] >> every jail we've ever visited there are usually troublemakers, and they make for compelling television.

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